About

A Canadian Curriculum Theory Project provides a digital place where curriculum scholars, administrators, policy makers, graduate students, teachers, and teacher candidates can converse, contribute and showcase ongoing provincial, national, and transnational curriculum theory and development projects. In turn, this website seeks to support historical and intellectual pro/vocations of a Canadian theoretical topos (Chambers, 1999), where curriculum theorists can transnationally bridge their inter/disciplinary differences (Pinar 2008). What Chambers (1999) and Pinar (2007) call the vertical and horizontal topographies of the particular places and regions we both live and work within. Here verticality is, Pinar (2007) explains, the historical and intellectual topography of a discipline. Whereas horizontality, he suggests, refers to analyses of present circumstances, both in terms of internal intellectual trends as well as the external social and political milieus influencing the field of curriculum studies. Studying the verticality and horizontality of such inter/disciplinary topographies, as Pinar (2007) makes clear, affords us opportunities to understand a series of scholarly moves both outside and within what Chambers (1999, 2003) calls the topos of Canadian Curriculum Studies. Moreover, this (de)institutionalized virtual site, if there is such a thing, provides a space for experimenting with curriculum theorizing as an aesthetic form of educational research and writing.

The site showcases among other things graduate students’ research and writing in relation to the vertical and horizontal dynamics of our international field of curriculum studies. The site also serves as a pedagogical resource for professors who teach courses on curriculum theory and development. Furthermore, this virtual project ties into Vision 2020 of the university of Ottawa in terms of building our future capacity for conducting curriculum studies research here in Canada and abroad that defies the conventional.

Nicholas Ng-A-Fook is the founder of A Canadian Curriculum Theory Project. He is currently Full Professor of Curriculum Theory within the Faculty of Education at the University of Ottawa. His intellectual pilgrimage within the context of teacher education began in 1998 when he travelled via Rarotonga in the Cook Islands and then New Zealand to Australia. Once there, he began and completed his Graduate Diploma in Education at the University of Western Sydney. He returned the following year to teach as a newly qualified high school science and history teacher in Penrith, New South Wales. Then in 1999, he returned to Canada and took on a long-term occasional position at an inner-city high school teaching Grade 9 English and Geography youth who were in turn identified by the school administration of being “at risk” of being pushed/dropping out of the public schooling system. That same year Mike Harris implemented Bill 160. Consequently, during the summer of 2000 Nicholas Ng-A-Fook enrolled into the Master’s of Education program at York University. Then during the summer of 2001 he left for Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge to study within its unique Curriculum Theory Project with William F. Pinar and Petra Munro Hendry. At this southern institution, he also had the opportunity to study and collaborate on different curriculum theory projects with internationally renowned curriculum scholars like William Doll Jr., Denise Egéa-Kuehne, and Claudia Eppert.

In the Fall of 2001, with the guidance of Celia Haig-Brown he briefly returned from Baton Rouge Louisiana to Toronto in order to defend his Master’s in Education thesis Beginning Re-Search: Towards An Understanding of Vulnerable Education. Over the next four years, while pursuing his studies at LSU, he worked closely with the United Houma Nation, the largest Franco indigenous community in Louisiana. Just two weeks prior to Hurricane Katrina in August of 2005, and upon the invitation of Judith Robertson, Nicholas Ng-A-Fook accepted a visiting professor position at the Faculty of Education within the University of Ottawa. That Fall he returned to LSU to defend his doctoral dissertation which in turn focused among other things on how the Louisiana state apparatus historically dictated educational exclusion through its infamous Jim Crow policies of racial segregation. It has since been published as An Indigenous Curriculum of Place. Utilizing participatory and critical ethnographic and oral history research methodologies he examined the life histories of United Houma Nation elders who experienced firsthand the complexities and difficulties of institutional racism. In 2006 he graduated with a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction with a minor concentration in Women and Gender Studies. The Faculty of Education at the University of Ottawa subsequently hired him as an assistant professor of Curriculum Theory.

As a curriculum theorist working with the Developing A Global Perspective for Educators (DGPE) extracurricular program and its cohort of students, he continues to collaborate with different indigenous communities, NGOs, teachers, and students. Together they create spaces for alternative historical narratives to speak within the Ontario curriculum. For the past two years, students and Nicholas travelled to Kitigan Zibi to work with Algonquin elders, teachers and students (see Reis & Ng-A-Fook, 2010). His unique experiences as a curriculum theorist working with various indigenous communities has afforded him invaluable opportunities to advance knowledge in relation to a place-based indigenous curriculum (Ng-A-Fook, 2011). Perhaps more importantly, such social action research has enabled Nicholas Ng-A-Fook to develop and advance important ethical protocols when collaborating on research projects with indigenous communities and marginalized youth.

Nicholas Ng-A-Fook continues to work collaboratively on a well established and ongoing internationalization of curriculum studies project between the Faculty of Education at the University of Ottawa and  Developing A Global Perspective for Educators. His specific research interests for this project seek to study how students are able to integrate a global perspective throughout their curriculum planning, implementation, and assessment while also addressing the Ontario Ministry of Education’s mandated curricular expectations in a course called Curriculum Design and Evaluation. Furthermore, and perhaps more importantly, Nicholas Ng-A-Fook is interested in how students develop critical perspectives of, as well as negotiate socio-culturally responsive strategies toward addressing such curricular absences within their present and future course programming.

Part of this project also involves the development of a permanent pre-service teacher candidate online newsletter and radio show for the website. The content for both the newsletter and radio show are developed in a foundations course called Schooling and Society. As a result, Nicholas Ng-A-Fook is currently researching how students are developing various curricular and pedagogical resources for this organization’s website, and in turn how their engagement with these projects then informs what Aoki calls their curriculum-as-planned, -implemented, and -lived with regards to developing a global perspective and working toward integrating social justice issues within their future teaching.

This website now features all of the Developing a Global Perspective for Educator’s activities over the course of the academic year, as well as pre-service candidates’ curriculum contributions on themes of development and peace making. In addition, the constructive critiques of NGO resources, along with the resources themselves are posted on the website. As part of his course requirements pre-service teacher candidates are required to create a newsletter for the website which in turn addresses issues of child poverty, human rights, environmental sustainability, peace-making curricula, etc. Students are also required to engage in various Community Service Learning projects.

Nicholas Ng-A-Fook is currently working with DGPE cohorts through the Curriculum Design and Evaluation course on the following two projects: 1) Mobilizing A Global Citizenship Perspective with Educators: Curriculum Development, Equity and Community Partnerships (funded by KNAER); and 2) Community Service Learning Science Fair project with grade 5/6 teachers and students at the Kikinamadinan elementary and high school within the Kitigan Zibi’s Anishinabeg School Board.

Research Interests within Graduate Program

Nicholas Ng-A-Fook continues to study the intellectual history of curriculum studies. He recently published Reconsidering Canadian Curriculum Studies. This edited collection invites us to ponder, pay attention, and to ask more, as we study the tensionality of differences of meaning in relation to the worldliness of curriculum studies. In turn, it provokes readers to study their historical topographies, their future lines of movement, while stretching their understandings of contemporary circumstances either here in Canada or abroad. As such, the chapters migrate across the different geocultural and interdisciplinary territories of curriculum studies (life-writing methodologies, phenomenology, anti-racist education, gender, semiotic analysis, curriculum theorizing, cultural studies, indigenous studies, place, etc.). Both established and junior scholars provide a diverse and thought-provoking array of their lived experiences inside and outside the institutional contexts of public schooling. This book would serve as an excellent introductory text for professors and students to study in courses like an Introduction to Curriculum Studies, Internationalization of Curriculum Studies, or Contemporary Issues in Curriculum Studies. For professors, educational researchers, and graduate students, these innovative essays will provoke them to imagine alter/native ways in which we might learn from reconsidering Canadian curriculum studies to advance knowledge within the broader international field of curriculum studies.

He also published Provoking Curriculum Theorizing: A Question of/for Currere, Denkbild and Aesthetics which offers an analysis of the cover of this book. This article considers how curriculum theorists can draw upon autobiographical writing strategies and emergent 2.0 technologies (Comic Life, Googling, etc.) to understand the aesthetic processes for surfing, screen capturing, and provoking a virtual narrative landscape. To do so, this article provokes the inter/disciplinary digital topographies of Canadian curriculum studies anew while remaining unfaithfully faithful to the concept of an old name like currere, in terms of its discursive narrative genealogies. As such, the article begins by tracing the vertical and horizontal autobiographical relationship to the vertical and horizontal digital narrative genealogy of the Provoking Curriculum Studies conference. The article then situates the tracing of such autobiographical and digital narrative snapshots to the theoretical concepts of currere and Denkbild. In turn, the article asks curriculum theorists to consider how they might frame future digital experimentations with curriculum theorizing as an aesthetic form of Denkbild, to provoke an uncommon countenance within the larger recurring narrative movements of Canadian curriculum studies.

He also recently co-published Reconceptualizing High School: Curriculum, Film, and Narrative Assemblies with Kate Robayo-Sheridan and Steve Noble. Together they published this paper in the Journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies. As part of this curriculum theory project, they sought to trace the emergence of curriculum theory in the United States. In turn, they reread its situated historical movements both against and with Frederick Wiseman’s 1968 documentary film High School. Moreover, this specific research project afforded them an opportunity to understand how the historical and often complicated conversations taking place within an American field of study might in turn provoke and inform their present understanding of the different curriculum reform movements taking place within Canada.

As a curriculum theorist, such recursive theorizing (praxis) enables him to develop and innovate new theoretical concepts and respective applications for the field of curriculum studies (see Lewkowich, 2009, 2010; Ng-A-Fook, 2009; Yu, 2010). In response to his work, Nahachewsky and Johnston (2009) write:

Ng-a-Fook’s autobiographical writing maps his search for a method of understanding Derrida’s curriculum on inhabiting and being inhabited by languages of the “other.” Through his autobiographical writing, he demonstrates how reflecting critically on the historical significance of one’s past helps to challenge the shadows of White colonialism perpetuated within the spaces of many Canadian classrooms. (p. x).

This research further contributes to the complexities of our understandings in terms of how Anglophone immigrant students experience the French language within French Catholic schooling system here in Canada. More importantly, his ongoing work in this area illustrates how studying such lived experiences autobiographically informs our understandings of philosophical and curricular concepts like language appropriation, alienation, and ex-appropriation within various instituted contexts such as the school curriculum in relation to the Calls to Action put forth by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. See his graduate students most recent research that responds to the Calls to Action: Living Between Truth and Reconciliation: Responsibilities, Colonial Institutions, and Settler Scholars and Unsettling our Narrative Encounters within and outside of Canadian Social Studies.

He recently completed the following research projects: 1) Mobilizing A Global Citizenship Perspective with Educators: Curriculum Development, Equity and Community Partnerships (funded by KNAER); and 2) Making Digital Histories: Virtual Historians, Historical Literacies, and Education (SSHRC).

He is currently collaborating with Ruth Kane and Linda Radford on a 5-year Insight SSHRC grant titled: Developing mobile media spaces for civic engagement in urban priority schools. Social Science and Humanities Research Council. Ottawa, Ontario: Canada.

Kristina Llewellyn and Nicholas Ng-A-Fook received a SSHRC Connection grant titled Oral History and Education: Theories, Dilemmas, and Practices. They will be publishing the presentations connected to this grant in an upcoming book with Palgrave MacMillan under the same title.

Contact Information

Office: Lamoureux 428, Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa

Telephone: 613-562-5800 ext.: 2239

Email: nngafook@uOttawa.ca

Twitter: @nick_ngafook

Publications & Technical Reports

Books:

  1. 1. Ng-A-Fook, N., & Ibrahim, A., & Pinar, W. F., & Smith, B., & Hebert, C.  (Eds.). (forthcoming). Understanding the Tasks of Curriculum Theorists: A Global Manifesto. New York, New York: Routledge.
  2. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Llewellyn, K.  (Eds.). (forthcoming).Storying Historical Consciousness in times of Reconciliation: Oral History, Public Education, and Cultures of Redress. New York, New York: Routledge.
  3. Ng-A-Fook, N., & Smith, B., & Pratt, S., & Radford, L. (Eds.). (under contract).  Hacking Education in a Digital Age: Teacher Education, Curriculum, and Literacies. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing Inc.
  4. Llewellyn, K., & Ng-A-Fook, N. (under contract). (Eds.). Oral History and Education: Theories, Dilemmas, and Practices. New York, New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  5. Ng-A-Fook, N., & Ibrahim, A., & Reis, G. (2016). (Eds.). Provoking Curriculum Studies: Strong Poetry and Arts of the Possible in Education. New York, New York: Routledge.
  6. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Rottmann, J. (Eds.). (2012). Reconsidering Canadian Curriculum Studies. New York, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. i-278.
  7. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2007). An Indigenous Curriculum of Place: The United Houma Nation’s Contentious Relationship with Louisiana’s Educational Institutions. New York: Peter Lang, pp. i-232.

Book Chapters:

  1. Ng-A-Fook, N. (in-press). Becoming an International: Curriculum Theory, Currere, and Subjectivity, pp. 1-15. In Mary Aswell Doll and Marla Morris (Eds.). The Reconceptualization of Curriculum Studies: A Festschrift in Honor of William F. Pinar. New York, New York: Routledge.
  2. Butler, J., Ng-A-Fook, N., & & Forte, R., & McFadden, F. (accepted). Ecojustice Education as a Praxis of Environmental Reconciliation: Teacher Education, Indigenous Knowledges, and Relationality. In Giuliano Reis & Jeff Scott. International Perspectives on the Theory and Practice of Environmental Education: A Reader.
  3. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2015). Autobiography, Intellectual Topographies, and Teacher Development. In Hua Zhang and William F. Pinar (Eds.). Teacher Autobiography and Teacher Development: A Reconceptualization of Teacher Education. New York, New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  4. Reis, G., Ng-A-Fook, N., & *Glithero, L. (2014). Provoking Ecojustice: Taking Citizen Science and Youth Activism Beyond the School Curriculum, pp. 39-61. In M. Mueller & D. Tippings (Eds.), Ecojustice, citizen science and youth activism. New York: Springer International Publishing Switzerland.
  5. Radford, L. & Ng-A-Fook. N. (2014). Framing Radical Hope within Forbidden Cities: Framing Radical Hope within Forbidden Cities: Curriculum, Social Networks and A Literacy of Dreams. In Rahat Naqvi and Hans Smits (Eds.), Framing Peace: Thinking About and Enacting Curriculum as “Radical Hope”, pp. 145-157. New York, New York: Peter Lang.
  6. Ng-A-Fook, N., Radford, L., & *Ausman, T. (2014). Living Hyph-e-nations: Youth Culture, Social Networking, and Third Spaces. In Shirley Steinberg and Awad Ibrahim (Eds.), The Critical Youth Studies Reader pp. 240-254. New York, New York: Peter Lang.
  7. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2013). Contemplating A Canadian Curriculum Theory Project: Currere, Denkbild and Intellectual Genealogies, pp. 172-181. In Erika Hasebe-Ludt and Wanda Hurren (Eds.), Contemplating Curriculum: Genealogies/Times/Places. New York, New York: Routledge.
  8. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2013). Fishing for Knowledge Beyond Colonial Disciplines: Curriculum, Social Action Projects, and Indigenous Communities. In A. Kulnieks, & D. Roronhiakewen Longboat, & K. A. Young, (Eds.), Contemporary Studies in Environmental and Indigenous Pedagogies: A Curricula of Stories and Place, pp. 285-305. Rotterdam The Netherlands: Sense publishers.
  9. Kulnieks, A. &, Ng-A-Fook, N. &, Stanley, D. & Young, K. (2012). Reconsidering Canadian Curriculum Studies: Framing An Approach to Ecojustice. In Nicholas Ng-A-Fook & Jennifer Rottmann (Eds.). Reconsidering Canadian Curriculum Studies, pp. 107-136. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  10. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2012). Navigating M/other-Son Plots as a Migrant Act: Autobiography, Currere, and Gender. In Stephanie Springgay and Deborah Freedman (Eds.), M/othering a bodied curriculum. Toronto, Ontario: University of Toronto Press.
  11. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2011). Decolonizing Narrative Strands of our Eco-civic Responsibilities: Curriculum, Social Action, and Indigenous Communities. In Kelly Young & Darren Stanley (Eds.), Contemporary Studies in Canadian Curriculum: Principles, Portraits, and Practices. Calgary, Alberta: Detselig Enterprises Ltd.
  12. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2009). Inhabiting the Hyphenated Spaces of Alienation and Appropriation: Currere, Language, and Postcolonial Migrant Subjectivities. In James Nahachewsky and Ingrid Johnson (Eds.), Beyond Presentism, pp. 87-103. Rotterdam The Netherlands: Sense publishers.

Journals Articles:

  1. Butler, J., & Ng-A-Fook, N., & Vaudrin-Charette, J., & McFadden, F. (2015). Living Between Truth and Reconciliation: Responsibilities, Colonial Institutions, and Settler Scholars. Transnational Curriculum Inquiry, 12(2), pp. 44-64.
  2. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Kane, R., Butler, J., Glithero, L., Forte, R. (2015). Brokering Knowledge Mobilization Networks: Policy Reforms, School Partnerships, and Teacher Education. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 23(122), pp. 1-30.
  3. Smith, B., & Ng-A-Fook, N., & Corrigan, J. (2014). Mobile(izing) Educational Research: Historical Thinking, M-Learning, and Technopolitics. McGill Journal of Education, 49(3), pp. 583-602.
  4. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Milne, R. (2014, Winter). Unsettling our Narrative Encounters within and outside of Canadian Social Studies. Canadian Journal of Social Studies, 47(2), pp. 91-109.
  5. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2014. Fall). Provoking the very “Idea” of Canadian Curriculum Studies as a Counterpointed Composition. Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 12(1), 97-118.
  6. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2014, Fall). Spinning Curriculum Designs at a Crossroads: Big Ideas, Conversations, and Reconciliation. Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 12(1), pp. (1-10).
  7. Lévesque, S., & Ng-A-Fook, N., Corrigan, J. (2014, summer). What does the eye see?: Reading online primary source photographs in history. Journal of Contemporary Issues in Technology and Education. 14 (1), pp. 1-23.
  8. Corrigan, J., & Ng-A-Fook, N., & Levesque, S., & Smith, B. (2013). Looking to the Future to Understand the Past:  A Survey of Pre-Service History Teachers’ Experiences with Digital Technology and Content Knowledge. Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, 1-2, pp. 49-73.
  9. Ng-A-Fook, N., & Radford, L., & Norris, T., & Yazdanian, S. (2013). Empowering Marginalized Youth: Curriculum, Digital Media, and Character Development. Canadian Journal of Action Research, 14 (1), pp. 38-50.
  10. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2013, Spring). Reconsidering our Attendance to Curriculum Development as…Events, Subjectivities, and a Cosmopolitan Praxis. Journal for the American Association for Advancement of Curriculum Studies, 9 (1), pp. 1-16.
  11. Tarc, P., & Mishra Tarc, A., & Ng-A-Fook, N., & Trilokekar, R. (2012). Re-conceiving International Education: Theorizing Limits and Possibilities for Transcultural Learning. Canadian and International Education Journal, 41 (3), pp. 1-40.
  12. McMurtry, A., Clarkin, C., Bangou, F., Duplàa, E., MacDonald, C., Ng-A-Fook, N. & Trumpower, D. (2012, Fall). Making interdisciplinary collaboration work: Key ideas, a case study and lessons learned. Alberta Journal of Educational Research, 58 (3), pp. 461-473.
  13. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Radford, L. & Ausman, T. (2012). Living a Curriculum of Hyph-e-nations: Diversity, Equity, and Social Media. Multicultural Educational Review, 4 (2), pp. 91-128.
  14. Corrigan, J. & Ng-A-Fook, N. (2012). Mobilizing Curriculum Studies in a (Virtual) World: Open Access, Edupunks, and the Public Good. Canadian Journal of Education, 35 (2), pp. 58-76.
  15. Smith, B., & Ng-A-Fook, N., & Berry, S. & Spence, K. (2011, December). Deconstructing a Curriculum of Dominance: Teacher Education, Colonial Frontier Logics, and Residential Schooling. Transnational Curriculum Inquiry, 8 (2), pp. 54-71.
  16. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2011, July). Provoking A Canadian Curriculum Theory Project: A Question of/for Currere, Denkbild and Aesthetics. Media: Culture: Pedagogy, 15 (2), (pp. 1-26).
  17. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Robayo-Sheridan, K. & Noble, S. (2011, Feb). Reconceptualizing High School: Curriculum, Film, and Narrative Assemblies. Journal for the American Association for Advancement of Curriculum Studies, 1 (1), (pp. 1-27).
  18. Reis, G. & Ng-A-Fook, N. (2010). TEK talk: so what? Language and the decolonization of narrative gatekeepers of science education curriculum. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 5 (4), (pp. 1009-1026).
  19. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2010). An/other Bell Ringing in the Sky: Greenwashing, Curriculum, and Ecojustice. Journal for the Canadian Association of Curriculum Studies, 8 (1), pp. 41-67.
  20. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2009). Understanding A Postcolonial Curriculum of Being Inhabited by the Language of the Other. Transnational Curriculum Inquiry Journal, 6 (2), pp. 3-20.
  21. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2009). Bridging a response within the watercoursings of empty places. Transnational Curriculum Inquiry Journal, 6 (2), pp. 51-53.
  22. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2005). A Curriculum of Mother-Son Plots on Education’s Center Stage, Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, 21 (4), pp. 43-58.
  23. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2003). A Curriculum Behind the Boys’ Locker Room Doors: Bodies, Desires, and Perpetuating Patriarchy. Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, 19 (4), pp. 65-72.

Book Reviews

Ng-A-Fook, N. (2004). Tough Fronts: The Impacts of Street Culture on Schooling. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 36 (6), pp. 747-752.

Conference Presentations:

  1. Ng-A-Fook, N., & Butler, J., & McFadden, F.,  & Vaudrin-Charette, J. (June, 2015). Addressing Truth and Reconciliation: Curriculum, Non-Aboriginal Teachers, and Public Education. Multimedia presentation at the Canadian Society for the Study of Education annual conference. Ottawa, ON, Canada, pp.1-10. (Invited to be a spotlight session)
  2. Ng-A-Fook, N. (May, 2015). Becoming an International: Curriculum Theory, Currere, and Subjectivity.  Paper presented at the 5th Triennial International Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies. Ottawa, ON, Canada, pp. 1-15.
  3. Ng-A-Fook, N. (May, 2015). Tracing Cosmopolitan Genealogies as Autobiographical-Intellectual Work. Paper presented at the 5th Triennial International Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies. Ottawa, ON, Canada, pp. 1-15.
  4. Ng-A-Fook, N. (April, 2015). Becoming International: Curriculum Theory, Currere, and Subjectivity. Paper presented at the American Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies. Chicago, IL, USA, pp. 1-15.
  5. Strong-Wilson, T., Ng-A-Fook, N., Hasebe-Ludt, E., & Nellis, R. (2015). Métissage/Memory/Denkbild/Trespass: The Worldliness of Canadian Curriculum in Between Indigenous, Ecological, and Trans/National Wisdom Traditions. Multimedia paper presentation at the annual American Education Research Association conference in Chicago, IL, USA, pp. 1-15.
  6. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Crowe, T., & Cardinal, S. (May, 2014). Engaging Community Service Learning Projects with First Nations Communities. Healthy Resilient Communities Conference. Canadian Alliance for Community Service Learning, Algonquin College, Ottawa, ON, multimedia presentation.
  7. Ng-A-Fook, N. (May, 2014). Contemplating Curriculum: Genealogies/Times/Places. Canadian Society for the Study of Education, Brock University, St. Catherines, ON, pp. 1-15.
  8. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Forte, R. (May, 2014). Becoming a cosmopolite in Ontario through Civics (Politics) – Vernacular? Islamic? Cultural? Canadian Society for the Study of Education, Brock University, St. Catherines, ON, pp. 1-15.
  9. Ng-A-Fook, N. (May, 2014). Engineering Social Studies: Curriculum, Backward Design, and Epistemic Violence. Canadian Society for the Study of Education, Brock University, St. Catherines, ON, pp. 1-15.
  10. Radford, L. & Ng-A-Fook, N. (March, 2014). Engaging Youth Activism: Curriculum, Social Networks and Radical Hope. American Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, pp. 1-15.
  11. Forte, R. & Ng-A-Fook, N. (March, 2014). Becoming Cosmopolitan: A Curriculum Without Consensus. American Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, pp. 1-15.
  12. Ng-A-Fook, N., *Smith, B., *Corrigan, J. (April, 2014). Remembering the App/aritions of a Traumatic Past: Forgetfulness, Mobile Applications and the Contestation of Colonial Logics. Multimedia paper presentation at the annual American Education Research Association conference in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, pp. 1-15.
  13. Mclean, L., Crowe, T., Ng-A-Fook, N., Kane, R., & Leet, L., Reimer, K., Glithero, L. (2013, October). Building Partnerships to Support Social Justice for All Learners. Interdisciplinary Education Conference, North American Chapter (NAC), World Council for Curriculum and Instruction (WCCI), Montreal, QC, pp. 1-15.
  14. Ng-A-Fook, N., Kane, R., Crowe, T., and Glithero, L. (June, 2013). Mobilizing Citizenship Education to The Edges: Curriculum Development, Equity, and Networking Research Partnerships. Multimedia paper presentation at the annual Canadian Association of Curriculum Studies Conference in Victoria, BC.
  15. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Lévesque, S. & Smith, B. (June, 2013). Disrupting Historical Narratives: Curriculum, Difficult Knowledge, and Colonial Frontier Logics. Multimedia paper presentation at the annual Canadian Association of Curriculum Studies Conference in Victoria, BC (Invited to be a spotlight session)
  16. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Lévesque, S. & Smith, B. (2013, April). Making Digital Oral Histories: Curriculum, Difficult Knowledge, and Colonial Frontier Logics. American Educational Research Association, San Francisco, California, pp. 1-15.
  17. Lévesque, S. & Ng-A-Fook, N. & Julie Corrigan, (2013, April). Looking to the Future to Understand the Past: A Survey of Pre-Service History Teachers’ Digital and Historical Literacies. American Educational Research Association, San Francisco, California, pp. 1-15.
  18. Lévesque, S. & Ng-A-Fook, N. & Stéphane Buffard, (2013, April). “What Does the Eye See?:” Reading Primary Resource Photographs in History. American Educational Research Association, San Francisco, California, pp. 1-15.
  19. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2013, March). “Provoking the very “idea” of Canadian Curriculum Studies in China: Autobiography, Intellectual Topographies, and Teacher Development”, 2nd International Conference on the Reform of Curriculum & Teaching and Teacher Development, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou China, pp.1-20 (Invited to present as a keynote speaker).
  20. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2012, July). Questioning Curriculum Theory as a Cosmopolitan Praxis: An Autobiography of Difference, pp. 1-15. The Fourth World Curriculum Conference, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Invited to present as a keynote speaker)
  21. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2012, May). Living a Curriculum of Hyph-e-nations: Diversity, Equity, and Social Media, pp. 1-20. Korean Association of Multicultural Education, Seoul, Korea. (Invited to present as a keynote speaker)
  22. Ng-A-Fook, N.(2012, April). Navigating M/other-Son Plots as A Migrant Act: Autobiography, Currere, and Gender, pp. 1-15. American Educational Research Association, Vancouver, BC.
  23. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Radford, L. (2012, April). Empowering Marginalized Youth: Curriculum, Digital Media, and Character Development, pp. 1-15. Conference for the John Dewey Society, Vancouver, BC. (Invited to present on the presidential panel)
  24. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2012, April). Reconsidering Canadian Curriculum Studies, pp. 1-20. American Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies, Vancouver, BC.  (Invited to give opening keynote address)
  25. Donald, D. & Ng-A-Fook, N. & Chambers, C. & Hasebe-Ludt, E. & Leggo, C. & Kelly, V. & Jordan, N. & Sameshima, P. (2012, April). Life Writing as Métissage: Curriculum Artifacts, Inter-national Places, and Stories, pp. 1-15. American Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies, Vancouver, BC.
  26. Smits, H. & Krasny K., & Ng-A-Fook, N. (2011, October). Making ourselves vulnerable as an aesthetics of curriculum theorizing, pp. 1-15. 5th Biennial Provoking Curriculum Studies Conference, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.
  27. Ausman, T., & Radford, L. & Ng-A-Fook, N., & Balsawer, V. (2011, May). Theorizing Precious beyond the Vulnerabilities of Dead-Ends: Curriculum, Culture, and Language/Analyse du film Precious au-delà des vulnérabilités des cul-de-sac: curriculum, culture et langue, pp. 1-5. Multimedia paper presentation at the annual Canadian Association of Curriculum Studies Conference in Fredericton, NB.
  28. Hasebe-Ludt, E. & Kelly, V. & Donald, D. & Ng-A-Fook, N.&, Audet, C. (2011, May).  Metis/sage/ing the Tensioned Topographies of Curriculum: Life Writing, Culture, and the Digital Commons/Métis/sage et topographies curriculaires sous tension: les récits de vie, la culture et l’agora numérique, pp. 1-15. Multimedia paper presentation at the annual Canadian Association of Curriculum Studies Conference in Fredericton, NB.
  29. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Radford, L. (2011, May). Curriculum as Schizoanalysis: Social Networking Regimes of Madness in Forbidden Cities/Le curriculum comme schizoanalyse: régime do folie, réseaux sociaux et cites interdites, pp. 1-15. Multimedia paper presentation at the annual Canadian Association of Curriculum Studies Conference in Fredericton, NB.
  30. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Radford, L. (2011, April). Social Networking Rhizomes of Desire: Curriculum, Schizoanalysis, and Two Regimes of Madness, pp. 1-15. Paper presented at the annual meeting of American Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies (AAACS). New Orleans, Louisiana.
  31. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Donald, D. & Chambers, C. & Hasebe-Ludt, E. (2010, May). Métis/sage-ing Anti-Colonial Narratives of a Canadian Post-Colony: Curriculum, Autobiography, and Place / Métissage de récits anticoloniaux reliés à la postcolonie qu’est le Canada: curriculum, autobiographie et lieux, pp. 1-15. Paper Presented at Canadian Association of Curriculum Studies Conference at 39th CSSE, Concordia University, Montreal, QC.
  32. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Norris, T. & Yazdenian, S. (2010, May). Engaging Digital Literacies: Popular Culture, Social Activism and Youth Identities / La promotion de la culture numérique: la culture populaire, l’activisme social et les identités des jeunes. Paper Presented at Canadian Association of Curriculum Studies Conference at Concordia University, Montreal, QC.
  33. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2010, May). Disrupting Connected Understanding: Curriculum, Gender and the Racialized Politics of Segregation / Perturber le savoir branché: curriculum, genre et racisme institutionnalisé, pp. 1-15. Paper Presented at Canadian Association of Foundations Education Conference at 39th CSSE, Concordia University, Montreal, QC.
  34. Radford, L. & Ng-A-Fook, N. (2010, May). Framing a Forbidden City within Social Networks: Pedagogy, Cyber Identities, and Adolescent Desire, pp. 1-15. Paper Presented at Canadian Association of Curriculum Studies pre-Conference, at 39th CSSE, Concordia University, Montreal, QC.
  35. Lloyd R. & Ng-A-Fook, N. (2010, May). Somatic/ing Within the Physical Landscapes of Literacy: Autobiography, Curriculum, and Phenomenology, pp. 1-5. Paper Presented at Canadian Association of Physical Education Conference at 39th CSSE, Concordia University, Montreal, QC.
  36. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2009, May). Provoking Rural Terroirs of Autobiographical Research within Canadian Curriculum Studies, pp. 1-15. Paper Presentation at Canadian Association of Curriculum Studies Conference at the 38th Annual Canadian Society for the Study of Education in Ottawa.
  37. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2009, May). Provoking Curriculum Theorizing: A Question of/for Currere, Denkbild and Aesthetics, pp. 1-20. Paper Presentation at the 4th Biennial Meeting of Provoking Curriculum Studies Conference at the University of Ottawa. Ottawa, ON.
  38. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2009, May). Provoking Rural Terroirs of Autobiographical Research within Canadian Curriculum Studies, pp. 1-15. Paper Presentation at Canadian Association of Curriculum Studies Conference at the 38th Annual Canadian Society for the Study of Education in Ottawa.
  39. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2009, May). Provoking Curriculum Theorizing: A Question of/for Currere, Denkbild and Aesthetics, pp. 1-15. Paper Presentation at the 4th Biennial Meeting of Provoking Curriculum Studies Conference at the University of Ottawa. Ottawa, ON.
  40. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2009, May). An/other Bell Ringing in the Sky: Greenwashing, Curriculum, and Ecojustice, pp. 1-15. Paper Presentation at the 4th Biennial Meeting of Provoking Curriculum Studies Conference at the University of Ottawa. Ottawa, ON.
  41. Ng-A-Fook, N. (October, 2008). Greening Curriculum Theorizing and Classroom Practices. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Journal of Curriculum Theorizing and Classroom Practices. (Bergamo). Dayton, OH.
  42. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2008, March). Deconstructing a Curricular Philosophy of Dominance: Assimilation, Appropriation, and Indigenous Communities, pp. 1-20. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. New York, New York.
  43. Ng-A-Fook, N. & Robayo Sheridan, K. (2008, March). (De)Nurturing Historical Contexts of A “Moral” Curriculum Within Wiseman’s 1968 Film High School, pp. 1-15. Paper presented at the annual meeting of American Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies (AAACS). New York, New York.
  44. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2008, March). Decolonizing Curricular Designs Within Environmental Education: What are the Autobiographical Implications? Paper presented at the annual meeting of American Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies (AAACS), pp. 1-15. New York, New York.
  45. Ng-A-Fook, N., Donald, D., Stewart, S., Pinar, B. (2007, February). Curricular Absence: Indigenous Concepts of Citizenship and Community in the Context of Trans-National Inquiry, pp. 1-15. Paper presented at the 3rd Biennial Provoking Curriculum Conference. Banff, Alberta.
  46. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2006, October). Understanding an Indigenous Curriculum in Louisiana through Listening to Houma Oral Histories, pp. 1-15. Paper presented at the 14th Biannual Canadian History of Education Association conference. Ottawa, ON.
  47. Ng-A-Fook, N. (2006, October). Curricular Misfits: Understanding a Post-Reconceptualization of Curriculum Studies, pp. 1-15. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Journal of Curriculum Theorizing (Bergamo). Dayton, OH.
  48. Ng-A-Fook, N.(2006, May). Understanding an Inter-national Indigenous Curriculum. Paper presented at the second Curriculum World Studies Conference, pp. 1-15. Tampere, Finland.

Contributions to Technical Reports:

  1. Co-principle Investigator on A Review of the Research and Inter-Jurisdictional Practice related to the Integration of 21st Century Skills and Attributes Across the Curriculum for the Ontario Ministry of Education (December, 2013).
  2. Co-principle Investigator on A Review of the Research on Inter-juridical Curriculum Implementation to Inform Future Curriculum Review Cycles in Ontario, Grades K-12 for Ontario Ministry of Education (December, 2013).
  3. Principal Researcher on Mobilizing A Global Perspective for Educators. Annual Report for Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research (September, 2013).
  4. Principal Researcher on Empowering Marginalized Youth: A Culturally Responsive Media Studies Program for Council of Ontario Directors of Education Two-year Comprehensive Report (December, 2010).
  5. Principal Researcher on Empowering Marginalized Youth: A Culturally Responsive Media Studies Program for Council of Ontario Directors of Education Annual Report (September, 2010).
  6. Co-Investigator on Curriculum Research and Benchmarking to Support the Curriculum Review in Social Studies Grades 1 to 6, History Grades 7 and 8, and the Canadian and World Studies Grades 9 to 12 (History Component) for Ontario Ministry of Education (December, 2010).
  7. Principal Researcher on Empowering Marginalized Youth: A Culturally Responsive Media Studies Program for Council of Ontario Directors of Education Annual Report (September, 2009).
  8. Curriculum Consultant on New Teacher Induction Program Evaluation research team for Ontario Ministry of Education (December, 2007).

Consultancies & Workshops

Ng-A-Fook, N. & Radford, L. & Midwood, K. (2010, May). Networking within a Forbidden City: Pedagogy, Cyber identities and 2.0 literacies. Multimedia workshop presented at the Ministry of Education/Faculties of Education Forum, Toronto, ON.

Ng-A-Fook, N. & Dao, K., Horsewood, I. (2009, June). A Culture of Peace Curriculum: Developing A Global Perspective for Educators. Multimedia workshop presented at the UNESCO Culture of Peace Conference at Queen’s University, Kingston, On.

Ng-A-Fook, N., & Katrine Cuillerier, & Norris. T. (2009, May). Engaging Youth Activism Through a Media Studies Curriculum. Multimedia workshop presented at the Ministry of Education/Faculties of Education Forum, Toronto, ON.

Ng-A-Fook, N. (2009, March). Schooling and Society: Social Action, Citizenship, and Education. Multimedia workshop presented to teacher candidates at the University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario.

Ng-A-Fook, N. (2009, March). Accessing and Developing Global Perspectives with Educators: Curriculum, Pedagogy, and Emergent Technologies. Multimedia workshop presented at Transition to Practice Conference at University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario.

Ng-A-Fook, N. (2008, September). Building a praxis of peace: integrating global education into Ontario curricula. Multimedia workshop presented to teacher candidates at the Peace and Global Citizenship: Conversations, Pedagogy and Curriculum Institute. University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario.

Ng-A-Fook, N. & Galvin, K. (2008, May). Inside the Teacher Candidate Studio. Multimedia workshop presented to teacher candidates at the Transition to Practice Conference. University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario.

Ng-A-Fook, N. & Matthews, S. (2007, May). Building a praxis of peace: integrating peace education into Ontario curricula. Multimedia workshop presented at the Ministry of Education/Faculties of Education Forum, Toronto, ON.

Ng-A-Fook, N. (2005). Weaving American Indian Education into the Curriculum. A one-day workshop for pre-service teachers at Louisiana State University.

Ng-A-Fook, N. (2003, November) Teaching Houma Culture and History from The Bayous Margins. Workshop presented at the annual meeting of National Indian Education Association. Greensboro, NC.

Media Interviews:

  1. Interviewed by Dennis Calnan for The Hill Times. Canada Has A Long Way to Go on International Education Says Experts. (Ottawa, retrieved from http://www.hilltimes.com/news/news/2015/10/12/canada-has-long-way-to-go-on-international-education-say-experts/43694).
  2. Interviewed by Dennis Calnan for The Hill Times. Ontario’s new health and sex education curriculum an election issue in some ridings. (Ottawa, retrieved from http://www.hilltimes.com/news/news/2015/10/12/ontarios-new-health-and-sex-education-curriculum-an-election-issue-in-some-ridings/43691).
  3. Interviewed by Oliver Sachgau. Canada’s education system failing aboriginal students. (Ottawa, retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/canadas-education-system-failing-aboriginal-students-report/article26246592/ on September 10, 2015).
  4. Interviewed by Marie-Lou St-Onge for Radio-Canada. Engagement Trudeau: éducation autochtone. (Ottawa-Gatineau, retrieved from http://ici.radio-canada.ca/emissions/voici_l_ete/2013/archives.asp? on August 17, 2015).
  5. Interviewed by Andréanne Baribeau for Radio-Canada. Engagement Trudeau: éducation autochtone. (Windsor, retrieved from http://ici.radio-canada.ca/emissions/matins_sans_frontieres/2012-2013/archives.asp?date=2015/08/17&indTime=1492&idmedia=7329521 on August 17, 2015).
  6. Interviewed by David Chabot for Radio-Canada. Engagement Trudeau: éducation autochtone. (Abitibi, retrieved from http://ici.radio-canada.ca/emissions/des_matins_en_or/2014-2015/archives.asp?date=2015/08/17&indTime=723&idmedia=7329551 on August 17, 2015).
  7. Interviewed by Evelyne Charuest for Radio-Canada. Engagement Trudeau: éducation autochtone. (Vancouver, retrieved from http://ici.radio-canada.ca/emissions/phare_ouest/2014-2015/archives.asp?date=2015/08/17&indTime=2574&idmedia=7329626 on August 17, 2015).
  8. Interviewed by Rudy Desjardins for Radio-Canada. Engagement Trudeau: éducation autochtone. (Edmonton, August 17, 2015).
  9. Interviewed by François Dubé for Radio-Canada. Engagement Trudeau: éducation autochtone. (Regina, retrieved from http://ici.radio-canada.ca/emissions/point_du_jour/2014-2015/archives.asp?date=2015/08/17&indTime=1192&idmedia=7329595 on August 17, 2015).
  10. Interviewed by Diyyinah Jamora for TABARET article titled Algonquin Exchange. (Retrieved from http://tabaret.uottawa.ca/en/2015-06/beyond-classroom on June 24, 2015).
  11. Interviewed by CTV News Power and Play for special segment titled Pro-Obama high school trip cancelled. (Retrieved from http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/abortion-debate-ends-ottawa-catholic-students-trip-to-ohio-1.1022968 on April 10, 2013).
  12. Interviewed by Cynthia Reynolds for a McLean’s Magazine Cover Story titled Why are schools brainwashing our children? (Retrieved from http://www2.macleans.ca/2012/10/31/why-are-schools-brainwashing-our-children/ on April 10, 2013).